BILL KILLEBREW

Bio    
Featured Piece
BILL  KILLEBREW Model Train

Model Train
- Oil on panel
16 x 24 in
$ 2,000.00


BILL  KILLEBREW Model Train
Model Train
Oil on panel  
16 x 24 in
$2,000
BILL  KILLEBREW After that Read Most of a Novel
After that Read Most of a Novel
Oil on canvas  
80 x 160 in
$14,500
BILL  KILLEBREW Bedroom in Florence
Bedroom in Florence
Watercolor  
17-1/2 x 23-1/2 in
$1,800
BILL  KILLEBREW Breakfast on
Breakfast on Comanche
Oil on panel  
18-1/4 x 36 in
$2,500
BILL  KILLEBREW Joleline
Joleline
Oil on panel  
16-3/4 x 22-1/2 in
$2,200
BILL  KILLEBREW She Liked it by the Water
She Liked it by the Water
Oil on canvas  
20-3/4 x 23-1/2 in
$2,200
BILL  KILLEBREW Studio
Studio
Watercolor  
16-1/8 x 13 in
$ 900
BILL  KILLEBREW The Grass Dies Under the Ginko
The Grass Dies Under the Ginko
Oil on canvas  
66-1/4 x 54 in
$5,500
BILL  KILLEBREW The Tobacco Leaf
The Tobacco Leaf
Oil on canvas  
21 x 39-3/4 in
$3,000
BILL  KILLEBREW They Discussed it At Length
They Discussed it At Length
Oil on panel  
17-3/4 x 25 in
$2,200
BILL  KILLEBREW We Had Lunch at Rotiers
We Had Lunch at Rotiers
Oil on panel  
18-3/4 x 37 in
$2,800

BILL  KILLEBREW

BILL KILLEBREW

BILL KILLEBREW Biography

 

 

 

 

BILL KILLEBREW Statement

"A family member who shall remain nameless once misinterpreted a song lyric to read 'I am a Southerner of nothing in particular.' (The actual reading is 'I am the son and heir…')

When informed of his mistake he was insistent that his version was the better of the two. I agree, being Southern born but having lived nearly everywhere as a child. I find that the quality defined as Southern has become metaphorical and I am left with my upbringing by well-meaning family and an abstract sense of belonging to a place and time that no longer seems to exist.

Each of my pictures is a representation of this concept, time and place as a metaphor. All my painting is abstract. I was raised by an Expressionist and even while becoming a painter of things, I have gravitated toward and aesthetic allowing for the introduction of the picture as a natural object in its own right, rather than a description of nature. Any significance achieved in the course of painting the picture is a significance drawn from memory, from upbringing and shaping by others, from a place and set of manners and morality drawn from these sources and worked out in a non-objective methodology allowing these factors to come out. Like abstract thinking, perhaps in a daze. A pattern slowly rises to the surface and makes itself apparent; the thing left in and thought to be unimportant becomes the passage that anchor the entire piece. The color quality worked out with difficulty becomes the light quality suddenly remembered."

Top of Page