KIRSTEN STINGLE

Bio    
Featured Piece
KIRSTEN  STINGLE Monolith

Monolith
- Stoneware, antique wooden base, gold enamel, paint, wax
32 x 16 x 16 in
$ 3,200.00


KIRSTEN  STINGLE Monolith
Monolith
Stoneware, antique wooden base, gold enamel, paint, wax  
32 x 16 x 16 in
$3,200
KIRSTEN  STINGLE Monolith
Emerge
Stoneware, antique post, fabric, antique objects, gold enamel  
66 x 37 x 32 in
$6,800
KIRSTEN  STINGLE Eternal Symphony
Eternal Symphony
Black stoneware with slip, stains, underglazes; mixed media  
29 x 36 x 12 in
$2,200
KIRSTEN  STINGLE Holding Space
Holding Space
Porcelain with slips, stains, underglazes; mixed media  
26 x 15 x 14 in
$4,400
KIRSTEN  STINGLE Tendrils
Tendrils
Black stoneware with slip, stains, underglazes; mixed media  
35 x 22 x 12 in
$5,200

KIRSTEN  STINGLE

KIRSTEN STINGLE

KIRSTEN STINGLE Biography

Kirsten Stingle received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in the Honors Tutorial College at Ohio University, in Athens, Ohio, in 1993 and her Master of Public Administration from the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, N.Y., in 2000. Since 2010, she has exhibited works in solo and group shows all over the U.S. She has received numerous awards and been featured in several publications for her work. Her ceramic pieces can be found in the permanenty collections of several museums and art centers in the Southeast.

Kirsten currently lives and works in Georgia.

KIRSTEN STINGLE Statement

“My sculptural work confronts a modern paradox: a wired and globally connected world that creates individual isolation and a superficial understanding of our place in the world. Working in the genre of narrative ceramics, I attempt to cut through the isolation by presenting common threads of the human experience. I create a fantastical, surreal world in which the inner psyche of the character and story slowly emerge. My goal is to create a dialogue with the viewer in which the human quest toward self-revelation can be realized.

All figures are hand-built porcelain stoneware without the use of molds. A straight pin is the primary tool I use to work on the detail in the face, hands and feet. Each ceramic piece is then finished using multiple layers of underglazes, stains, and slips, as well as mark making to achieve a depth of color. After it is fired, I construct and assemble the mixed media elements, which include welding, carpentry, sewing, felting, encaustic, fabric staining, and fabric manipulation.”

Top of Page