ROBYN HORN

Bio    
ROBYN  HORN

“The process of wood materializing into stone shapes is the basis of what I am trying to accomplish creatively. My latest series, Architectural Elements, deals with structures that are reminiscent of fortresses or temples."

Featured Piece
ROBYN  HORN Blocked Up

Blocked Up
- Maple Burl
18-3/4 x 23-1/2 x 6 in
$ 5,000.00


ROBYN  HORN Blocked Up
Blocked Up
Maple Burl  
18-3/4 x 23-1/2 x 6 in
$5,000
ROBYN  HORN Linear
Pierced and Dented
Pine, acrylics, and steel  
21 x 19 x 9 in
$4,000
ROBYN  HORN Industrial Series No.12
Screwed
Pine and Steel  
19 x 9 x 9 in
$3,500
ROBYN  HORN Slipped Millstone
Slipped Millstone
Birdseye Redwood  
23 x 24 x 7 in
$6,000
ROBYN  HORN Tilted Keystone with One Loose
Tilted Keystone with One Loose
Cocobolo  
24-3/4 x 10 x 5-3/4 in
$5,000
ROBYN  HORN Fractured Millstone
Fractured Millstone
Jarrah burl  
22 x 6-1/4 in
Sold
ROBYN  HORN Intertwined
Intertwined
Redwood  
30 x 17-1/2 x 8 in
Sold
ROBYN  HORN Little Flipper
Little Flipper
Cocobolo  
7 x 13 x 5 in
Sold

ROBYN  HORN

ROBYN HORN

ROBYN HORN Biography

Wood sculptor Robyn Horn is drawn to volume, form, texture and negative space. Her abstracted sculptures convey her interest in geometry and the linear aspects of architecture.

Horn received her BA degree from Hendrix College (AR). Her work is in the collections of the Museum of Arts & Design (NY), the Detroit Institute of Art (MI), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (CA), the Mint Museum of Craft + Design (NC), the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum (DC), the Ogden Museum of Southern Art (LA) and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MN).

Robyn currently works from her studio in Central Arkansas.

ROBYN HORN Statement

“The process of wood materializing into stone shapes is the basis of what I am trying to accomplish creatively. My latest series, Architectural Elements, deals with structures that are reminiscent of fortresses or temples. The heavy textures suggest layers of dry laid stones. I was surprised at the effect that groupings of these pieces achieve. They become more of an installation or village when they are displayed together.”

Top of Page